Rosemary, Dill, Zukes, Punkins and Squarsh

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Don’t know who took this but I love it. This pic is just…sublime. 

If you live in the USA, sometimes you pronounce harmless vegetable names in weird ways. Punkin for pumpkin. Squarsh for squash. There! Title all cleared up.

If I ignore the political theatre of cruelty going on right now…like, super-hard…yeah. I’ll be just like everyone else! If I ignore it, it will ‘sort itself out’ and there’ll be rainbows and unicorn candidates of such startling purity and inspiring goodness that I’ll just have to not bother voting for them. Because they once owned a pug and pugs are overbred, with breathing and digestion problems. Strike, you’re out, unicorn.

Yes, the left really is that bad right now. Yep. Purity tests worse than anything given to young girls in conservative Christian households before a Purity ball where they prance about with daddy as a date. Gulp.

 
Ah, mini garden. So, spent about eleven bucks on plants. Got them in the ground. I am hoping Brigit, or Leatherface or Gremlin, doesn’t, uh, investigate them with her…rapid and powerful digging skills. Or her shiny young dog teeth. Even with tires to guard them, Brigit the Wonder Pup might just goofily decimate my hopes of zukes sprinkled with fresh dill. Is that even a thing? It is now!

 
I also transplanted some catnip, which is growing EVERYWHERE, to combat the weeds in the front rock garden. I bought a single clump of it years ago, when we still had cats here. I planted it in one spot. Now it’s…legion. Which is fine. It smells good. It’s a pretty plant. You can’t kill it with a nuke.

So, onward to writing.

My elderly computer went to a farm in upstate New York, so I have files on a zip drive. I was going through them. As you do. What’s this? I open a novel I started, a while ago. It’s got a pretty good solid start, over twenty thou words. No supernatural anything, just people being people. As they sometimes do even in my gothic mansion, cannibals in the attic, ghosts in the porridge sort of work. A title borrowed from Lifetime for Women. It’s About Love…gag me with a barbecue fork.

Oh hey, let’s work on this, something in my dormant little mind screams into the great void. Why? Who’s gonna read it, the void screams back, before farting thunderously and telling me I do look fat in those pants.
So a project of sorts.

I’m finding it hard to concentrate longer than five seconds at a time lately. Which is my problem, not yours.

The ground squirrels have moved into the bank. The mini garden, for now, seems well. It’s been one day. I have a project I am at least wanting to get back to. Maybe the inner tide has decided not to direct me toward sharp objects for a bit. Hurray!

Oh, before I sign off…I have two books. Two. Oregon Gothic and House on Clark Boulevard. I also have short plays available for production over on ten-minute-plays dot com

I promise neither book is a fragmented horrorscape of gardening news and despair over unicorn candidates not being unicorn enough. I promise!

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Some famous painting. 
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2 thoughts on “Rosemary, Dill, Zukes, Punkins and Squarsh

  1. I didn’t know where to message you; I read your play The Man Who Went Insane From Money and I quite enjoyed it. I thought it was honest, aggressive, playful, fun, and dramatic. The line where the poor woman says “I’ll never get new shoes again” really hit me. It also felt like you did her character so well; talking about how she tried to be this thing for men, and how that will just turn you into a wretch until you waste away your life. Also Tyler…man. Reminded me a little of Tyler Durden. Dang, did that woman ever pick the wrong bank to flip out in. I also liked the mechanic you used where nothing changed once they died, and in death they were still just as lost about what to do with themselves as we are in life about what to do about death. That line about political correctness was refreshing as well; everything feels so repressed in public discourse lately it was nice to hear someone who feels repressed being honest. Very nice job, and I hope you get more attention for your work.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Hi. Chris– thank you so much for reaching out to tell me all that. That short play is actually a favorite of mine. It arrived out of a fun conversation I had with a friend of mine about what if bank tellers were honest with you about your bank account or banking. All the best to you. Cheers!

    Like

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